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20140306
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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
everywhere in this particular environment. because you have segments of high tech manufacturing. you have segments of innovative financial services. all of those types of businesses in this day and age need skilled productive talent. >> we don't know yet what's going to happen in the state of georgia, whether or not they will follow the lead of arizona and reject the pending legislation. but already we are seeing businesses like delta airlines and others try to distance themselves from what might happen in the state. how important is it for a company like delta to do that? >> well, delta's got a couple of different things at play here. there's lots of choice in airlines, right? and so they're in a very competitive business. they don't want to send the signal that they're aligned with the state, that is particularly unwelcoming or seems to be unwelcoming to certain individuals. and so that would be in the minds i'm sure of the management of delta. >> finally you've been crunching the numbers, doing the retch for a long time -- the research for a long time. more broadly speaking what might
borders supplied a map that shows the increasingly hostile environment for journalist. the areas you see the darker colors, those are the most dangerous areas. and every day we are seeing violence against reporters in russia, egypt, venezuela, mexico. pretty much around the world. is enough being done to help them and what can be done? >> no, i don't think enough is being done. if you take the case of egypt, the arrest of journalists and bloggers is nothing new. the same is true of journalists in saudi arabia, we have seen some in china being arrested left right and center. what can be done, leader in the free world can speak on behalf of these judgists, raise their names in meetings condition aid to improvements in human rights and i think collectively, if we stand up for these political prisoners and journalists we cannot only see their release but the gradual reform of liberal societies. just relently i had my own experience a heated confrontation with iran's foreign minister over the imprisonment of one who has spent four years in prison for criticizing the regime and a outcry. he wa
an additional grievance to talk about on social media. theoon as he lost information environment, he began to bleed supporters. when that happened, use on acceleration of the opposition. >> the media's first focused on the terrible and tragic deaths of roughly 78 people in the square but the real story was the loss of political support by virtue of being connected to the internet. >> the me talk about the whole new prize you are offering. explain that. the whole book is about how the internet can solve global problems. how will be a factor in the do come forward to this million dollar prize. i am literally putting my money where my mouth is. >> this is your money. >> this is a personal donation. google is doing things in this area and many are, as well. there are a series of problems -- empowerment of individuals, anti-censorship, illicit trafficking in illicit networks. technologies can be used to make those worse or better. i personally want to fund the people who are trying to make the problems better for citizens. there are plenty of heroes, we want to find them all. look at africa, fo
steps in advancing and protecting human rights. to foster an environment that allows for dialogue and political reconciliation, some of the specific areas we encourage progress is in releasing prisoners who have -- encouraging confidence building and reconciliation and accountability for allegations of security force excesses. this, weghout all of unequivocally reject violence on all sides and we want to encourage the positive evolution bahrain.jn -- of >> about venezuela. thishreat continues in country against freedom of expression. president maduro is opening a news conference about peace. about it?our comments >> on more specific venezuela developments, i would have to give the floor to marie. but with respect to the human rights report, we certainly identified a number of key concerns in development in 2013. the passage of presidential decree powers, increases of power in the executive branch, we documented legal actions against tv stations, media outlets and journalists. we also documented the use of the judiciary to intimidate and selectively prosecute political union busine
equipment does not hold up to the harsh environment, which can represent the challenge. as john henry smith, one man is trying to eliminate one part of the challenge. >> i was watching a heartbreaking news story about children in war zones and it explained the six left therapy to bring them back to humanity was just to play. simple, unstructured play. >> that was all the inspiration tim janeghan needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to communities, but he knew they didn't last long in the harsh playing field found in those communities. that's when he imagined a solution. >> to make a ball for the children that would not go flat. they could play and get the therapy. >> tim janeghan is a lyricist, who worked with a number of famous musicians, including siting. when he mentioned the idea to sting, he not only liked the idea, he offered to fund the research and design phase of developing the ball. >> let this be so successful that i can do for someone else what he did for me some day. it was, you know, i still get emotional when i think about it. >> 11 months, two tries lair,
are not usually arrested and jailed? >> no, we have seen it in very restrictive environments so the central asian stands in china for example, there's been a crack down in foreign reporters. so this is really a worrying signal they are also going to go after foreign reporters. and it is one of the ways of giving out news -. >> egypt is a country that has been very close to the united states in the recent past. no amount of jake carney today at the white house brief and talking about these reporters will make egypt it seems simply say okay, go and sin no more. >> i think egypt is a critically important country. your four are among four that have been -- it's really almost impossible to be the critical of the government now. egypt is the most important country. it is critical to pay more attention, egypt hasn't gotten the attention it deserves. i think in the last seven or eight months and it is at a critical juncture right now. for more open debate about a range of issues. >> from freedom house, and from amnesty international, thank you very much for being with us today. >> thank you so much. >> b
, international correspondents are not usually jailed. >> no, we've seen them in different environments around the world. in china there has been a crackdown on foreign reporters, and even in russia in this past year. but open countries it's less common. this is a worrying signal by egypt. they are going to go after foreign reporters. in this case it's one of the main areas to get out news and information. it's a particular concern to us. >> michael posener, what do you make of it? egypt has been a major recipient of american aid but no amount of jay carney today at the white house briefing talking about these reporters is going to make egypt simply say, okay, fellas, go and sin no more. >> yeah, i think egypt is a critically important country at a have dangerous moment right now. it's not just your four journalists among dozens that have been arrested and are being held. civil society, human rights activists, it's almost impossible to be critical of the government now even on things how they drafted the constitution without coming under the government's wrath. egypt is the most important coun
cooperation on the economy, security, defense, and the environment, but those ties are now being tested. well let's get more now from abdul, he is a professor of political science at the uae university, and joins us via skype from dubai. thank you for being with us. this does seem like a very public move in a very conservative region. is there any significant importance to the timing of this decision to withdraw the envoys? >> yeah, this is definitely more than brotherly quarrel here. this is serious. we have not seen anything like this in the 33 years of the gcc, and this time around, you know, we were all surprised that three of the gcc's states decided to pull their ambassador. although it was very clear that they were annoyed towards qatar, very angry -- >> what is behind the anger. what is behind this avowance and anger? >> -- very serious move. >> sorry, you probably didn't hear my question. if you could explain what is behind this anger and annoyance towards qatar? i believe we may have just lost our guest there. abdul. unfortunately we will try, though to get him back on skype though.
environment to work in. we should point out, these three individuals, these al jazeera journalists are among thousands of protesters, activists and other journalists who are facing a similar ordeal many say it's trials like this and other detentions that are a troubling sign that egypt is going back to a repressive, authoritative state instead of going towards fulfilling the promises of the 2011 revolution. >> syrian government forces are waging a campaign of siege warfare and starvation against civilians as part of the military campaign against rebel fighters. >> that's among the findings of a u.n.-mandated independent report which has just been released. the investigation, catalogue of the suffering 250,000 people who are besieged across syria, government forces were accused of denying basic aid in order to force people to choose between surrender and stashation. war crimes have been committed by opposition groups. more from geneva >> reporter: this is that report. 7th report of the independent international commission on inquiry on syria since that commission was set up by the u.n. in 201
in that environment was not correcting the problem. it was enhancing the problem. >> reporter: they hemmed to write georgia's juvenile laws. they say they're better off being rehabilitated in their home where rather than being influenced by older hardened offenders. >> what we found out a lot of these children coming into the system were not really bad children. they were doing dumb things. so we wanted to find a better way of treating them under the local level. >> reporter: georgia is following states like texas and louisiana by diverting juveniles to community-based programs. >> runaway or possession of alcohol, rather than having those children detained, is there there are interventions that will happen between the youth and specific state agencies to get to the underlying cause. >> reporter: a new commission is in charge of making sure that the programs are consistent and effective scenario across the s. the state also believes they will save a lot of money in this change. the community based programs the governor said will cut the costs to $3,000 a year. the laws will prevents judges from acc
decided that he would try to answer that question and he runs this environment will help program and collected sippy cups from and sentnd toys "r" us them to an independent lab in texas to be tested. he found out in fact roughly 1/3 of them did contain estrogen-like chemicals. >> in that pink sippy cup? >> his daughter's sippy cup was reaching estrogenic chemicals. his fears were founded. >> what can i do to her? >> this is the big question. we know a lot about bpa. it is one of the most of the chemicals on the planet. and we know these chemicals generally are associated with a range of negative health effects. but the specific effect of any slightlymical varies from chemical to chemical. we actually don't know what chemical is leaching out of that sippy cup. it is impossible to know. there is a high correlation with rest cancer -- with breast cancer. other specific diseases vary from chemical to chemical. michael green, the way he describes it as an implant science experiment that we are on our families all of the time. >> we're going to take a break and then come back to this d
environment requires us to requirementize and make difficult choices. some we must make now. >> despite the problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the f35. russia and china are developing fighters that will outgun and outfly the u.s. fleet. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on the promise of a jet that can tackle all threats in all conditions. >> the budget proposal calls for retiring the u2 spy plan for one controlled remotely. >> a pregnant woman apparently drove into the water, driving a minnie van with her three children, ages 10, 9 and 3. life guards and other beach goers rushed in. they pulled all for to safety before the van was submerged by the waves. one of the children told rescue areas, "mummy is trying to kill us, please help." the mother was incoherent, uncooperative. she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation, the children have been placed in protective custody. >> tex joons have gone to the polls. greg abbott peat out eight other candidates, facing off against wendy davis. she is the first female nom ni since ann richards in 1994
the russian border where they worried their way of life is under threat. >>> plus china's choking environment, smog reaching critical levels. and a change in athletic history. we have more next. we are not meant to be your first choice for entertainment. al jazeera america. we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. >> we pursue that story beyond the headline, pass the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capital. >> we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. >> and follow it no matter where it leads - all the way to you. al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> welcome back to the top stories here on al jazeera. russia has promised to protect its naval fleet in southern ukraine. thprotests have continued into turkey for a second day over a corruption scandal involving the prime minister. turkey's president signed a new law tightening the government's grip on the judiciary which has been investigating claims of corr
considers media independent the environment in which reporters work, and transparency of government and private institutions that effect news gathering. this year, fin hand, the nether-land, and norway lead the list. but the u.s. regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46th. one wrung above haiti. but questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall, american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the everybody respect for rule of law in this country. the yep respect for free press. >> a lot of people look at the united states as a model. there needs sob some improvement regards the way they are able to do their jobs. >> now, here is an irony, president obama who was a constitutional lawyer, has doubled down on going after whistle blowers and the journalists who report their leaks. which was first issued by the bush administration is now being prosecuted by president obama attorney general errick holder. >> the so we know the government can access phone records, i'm wondering how that knowledge, that information is impacting e
into the wrong hands in the middle of a very volatile security environment? >> mr. chairman, in lebanon, much as we have in many other countries, we have an office of defense cooperation in beirut. their primary purpose truly is to ensure that we have the appropriate safeguards, and that were performing the appropriate end-user monitoring is what we call it when we provide foreign military sales of equipment, partner nations. so our u.s. personnel in the office of defense cooperation in beirut will do that and enhance end-user monitoring to ensure that that equipment is both accounted for and being used properly. >> i found it interesting in the dialogue with the lebanese armed forces their take on the saudi arabia and french potential for receipt of saudi arabia and assistance to purchase french military assets. they said they liked the was equipment a lot better, basically is what the lebanese armed forces was saying. but i gather from your testimony, general, you do like the more partners the better, the more systems the better. you don't find that saudi arabia provision of 3 billion to pu
in these countries, and the gcc is meant to encourage cooperation on the economy and the environment. those are being tested. >>> the former ambassador to the u.n. said ca qatar, we have notg to do with egypt. they are free to deal with their own issues, but we will never support. this is unacceptable. we are in the 21st century. egyptian people are our people. so any dictator coming forward through the blood of his own people, and they want us to support that dictator, that's taking us back. these countries have voted for a dictatorship. if we say, listen, it is your business if you want to support dictators, but we're not going to support dictators. having said that, that should not come back with our relationship. we are opposed to any intervention of outside powers of any of these states. >> let's go to saudi arabia, where we find a columnist a. having a difference of opinion is one thing. being accused of interfering with the internal affairs of another country, let's take saudi arabia, that's another thing entirely. what has infuriated saudi? >> playing with the mix of islam religion and politi
such as entities committed to protecting and preserving our nation's environment natural resources or the communities that could be directly impacted by such activities. to be clear, i strongly support the rights of industry to have an opportunity to provide comments on proposed rules. it fosters more informed quality rulemaking and benefits both business and broader society. indeed, that's why our current administrative procedures mandate that a public comment process be conducted to allow any individual or corporation to participate and provide input and feedback in an equal, fair and open process. that's current law. the amendment that congresswoman duckworth and i are proposing today would simply ensure that all participants in the rulemaking process be provided equal consultation rights with agencies. for example, as the ranking member, mr. cummings, noted earlier, if the u.s. department of agriculture were to have a rule in an effort to protect the health of everyday americans, our amendment would ensure that not only the agribusinesses but also food safety experts, children'
. you have comcast in the future trying to get through the regulatory environment eyeing time warner because they want to have a broadband capacity. they want to have the pipes. what is the impact of all this with increasingly video as an important part of what the internet is about? >> we want to have as much competition as we can in infrastructure. we may not have enough. the concerns about time warner and comcast are about who is the competitor. google fiber is present in four cities. we want as much competition as possible. >> how does it work? in my home state, asheville is one of the cities. >> the simple answer is the fiber is run to the poll or the curb and for a small fee, you pay to get it connected. if you want slow speed connectivity which is about five megabits, we will give it to you free for seven years. most people like to pay the roughly equivalent internet connection fees they do today and they get almost one gigabit speed up and down. it is revolutionary. >> in terms they have not seen anything like it. >> the speed is so much greater. are people clamoring for this
. to remain, it needs to adopt to a rapidly changing commercial environment. >> as well as cutting costs and changing itself, the airline is pushing for a change in the way its regulated. australian's government has been considered lifting restrictions on foreigners with a majority stake in the airline. the country wants the government to garb tee its debts with change from within and a change in regulation, quantity at us management thinks they can help the airline fly high once again. >> you are watching the aljazeera news hour. we have more to come, including the crisis in ukraine, plus the secret files of yanukovych, we reveal the contents of thousands of documents which could incriminate the former president. >> real madrid take a big step toward the quarter finals. details coming up. >> these protestors have decided that today they will be arrested >> these people have chased a president from power, they've torn down a state... >> what's clear is that people don't just need protection, they need assistance. al jazeera america. we open up your world. >> here on america tonight, an o
it needs to adapt to a commercial environment. but as well as cutting costs and changing itself, the airline is pushing for a change in the way it is regulated. australia's government is wering lifting restrictions on foreigners the company also wants the government to guarantee it's steps, with change from within, and a change of regulation the management thinks they can help the airline fly high once again. andrew thomas, al jazeera, sidney. >> other world headlines a second controversial audio tape featuring the tickerrish prime minister has been released. it allegedly captures him telling his son for more money from a businessman, in return for government incentives. he has said the first reporting was a fakes, al jazeera cannot independently verify the authenticity of the tapes. here in cat catar, 12 people have been killed. it is believed -- which tore through the building close to the city's landmark mall. an indian soldier shot five of his colleagues dead before killing himself. he was deployed in a counter terrorism unit. u.s. has just released it's annual global report
to selected researchers and human rights activists in 100 countries. media independence, the environment in which reporters work and transparency, to affect news gathering. this year fin hand, the netherlands and norway lead the list. but the u.s., regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46, one rung above haiti. sandy baron questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the general respect for rule of law in this country. the general respect for free press. >> a lot of people looks at the united states as a model. there need to be some improvements regarding the way the journalists and their associates are able to do their jobs. >> well, in fact some investigative journalists are saying that news gathering is becoming more difficult, especially when it comes to reporting national security issues. tony. >> randall pinkston, thank you. >>> antigay policies in russia is one of the issues, rosalind jordan, before i hack up a lung here. >> people who were protesting against their govern
environment confrontation between security forces and anti-government protesters. they're demanding the release of fellow students detained during two weeks of unrest. more marchs have been called for sunday. at least 18 people have been killed so far. and opposition leader has boycott peace talks called for by president nicolÁs maduro. he believes the crisis will get worse. >> i believe we need to create the conditions to create change. it requires being strong in the face of the government who has had problems of legitimacy from the start. even beyond those problems it has had problems in governing. you have economic problems that are going to start a political crisis. the political crisis in the face of the government that, let's say, covers its eyes that does not want to face problems or resolve problems. it will reach such propulsion that they will tell maduro that you must either fix the problem or go. >> roadblocks in several venezuelan cities. they have been central in the scene of fierce battles between protesters and security forces. we travel to valencia where protesters
environment, and he had a mum and he had grandparents and teachers who looked out for him. his view was if every child - they should have the opportunities he had. we all have a responsibility to make sure we provide that to them, and there are examples of programs that are working, improving the young men, the boy's lives, putting them on a positive trajectory, and we should put them to scale. it's good, not just for moral reasons, but it's good for the economy. they are the workforce for tomorrow. >> you talk about what is good for the economy and important for business, you will need the partnership of business. this is an initiative funded not by the federal government. >> the president said it's not a big federal government program. we shouldn't require additional resources, we should be smarter about how to use the resources and make sure they support programs that work and create incentives. this responsibility comes down on the business community. they can provide summer jobs, internship, mentorship, funding of not for profit organizations such as becoming a man. when you li
is he lived in a forgiving environment. he had a mom and teachers and adults who looked out for him. his hope was that these young men would have the chances that he had. programs that are improving these boys' lives amount putting them on -- and putting them on a positive trajectory, so we can touch many, many more men and do what we know will work. that's good not just for moral reasons but that it's good for our economy. they are our workforce of tomorrow and we hav should inven them. >> you talk about what's important for economy and business and you will need the cooperation of business. >> the president said this is not another big federal program. in fact we shouldn't require additional resources. we should be smarter about how we use the resources that we do have. we should make sure that the funds that we have are going to support programs that work and creating incentives for programs that work. but this responsibility comes down on the business community. and they have responsibility. they can provide summer jobs. internships, mentorship, funding of not for profit provide thes
and a challenging and changing strategic environment requires us to prioritise and make difficult choices. some of those choices we must make now. >> despite the many problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the s35, arguing current fighter jets are obsolete and china and russia are developing fighters that will outfly and outrun. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on a jet that can tackle all jets in all positions. >> brazil is working overtime to get ready for the start of the 2014 world cup tournament in june. to mark the 100 day count town organizers lit up the stadium and monument in the colours of the flag. brazilians found the numbers hosting the tournament fell to a low. many criticise it as at an all-time low. >> having this lit up almost every day is important. it's beautiful. for people from rio de janeiro, the world cup is more important. >> brazil should be the winner. we deserve the victory after all our struggles. >> let's get the rest of the sport. >>> ukraine's friendly match with the united states will go ahead on wednesday, having cha
sit-in on the environment in a generation. consumer advocates at the environmental working group are warning that a chemical used to make yoga mats and flip flops can now be found in more than 500 food items. the chemical azodicarbonamide is often used in bread, croutons, pre-made sandwiches and snacks made by brands including pillsbury, nature's own, sara lee, kroger and little debbie. the restaurant chain subway recently announced it was phasing out the use of the chemical after an online campaign. the chemical is not approved for food use in australia and europe. and fernando gonzalez, one of the members of the cuban five has been released after mother 15 years behind bars. he was transferred thursday to an immigration prison pending deportation back to cuba. havana,er spoke in praising the release of her son. >> for the cuban people that have been fighting for a long time for this return, it is also a victory. convicted, and later of espionage. they say they were not spying by trying to monitor violent right-wing exile groups. three others remain in prison. and those are some
environment with controlled education get there is a wonderful wolved world out there in america. it turned into a question and answer period and there were students asking questions, most of them dealing with agriculture and i was answering them through ed, the interpreter and at a certain point it became too rapid fire and he took it over and took over the conversation. i remember one big-faced kids who said who sets the markets of -- markets for agriculture products? what would be the price for beans, rice, corn, otes and wheats. i answered him that the market sets the prices. how does the market set the prices? there's a buy whore makes the offer, there's a sell whore decides whether or not to take it. if the seller says no, the buyer might decide to raise his price until they get to a place where they agree. that was an amazing concept that it looked like they'd never heard that before. no one sets the prices? how can it be that no one sets the prices? and second thing, how many times -- how often does the price change? it can change hundreds of times a day. it changes every transactio
wage, unemployment benefits and the environment. so the do nothing congress held a hearing yesterday entitled enforcing the president's constitutional duty to faithfully execute the law. the intent was clear, attack the president. and it was held in the judiciary committee which has your diction over immigration. here was lots of discussion. this is where the president has power to temporarily suspend the deportation of people who came here to the u.s. as children. apparently when the president stood just over there last month and delivered his state of the union address saying he would use his pen and phone to take executive action where the congress was taking no action, well, they didn't go over well for this do nothing cock. look, i know it's easy for republicans to blame obama and why they can't do reform this year. but you have to keep it connected to reality. you put your principles for immigration reform on the table. you call them standards, and there was some things i liked and some things i didn't. but what i said was, good, thank you, it's a nice start. let's sit down and
said that he lived in a more for giving environment. he had a mom and he had grandparents and teachers who really looked out for him. and his view was that every child should have the opportunities that he had. and we all have a responsibility to make sure that we provide that to them and there are many examples of programs that are working that are really improving these young men, the boys lives and putting them on a positive trajectory. and it is our collective responsibility to take the programs to scale so that we can touch many, many more men and do what we know will work. and that is not just for moral reasons. but because it is good for our economy. they are our workforce of tomorrow and we should invest in them. >> you talk about what is good for our economy and what is important for business. and after all, you will need the partnership of business. this is initiative that would be funded not by the federal government. >> that's right. the president said this is not another big federal government program. in fact, we shouldn't require additional resources. we should be smarte
insurance company. mr. allison was awed on that visit, he was awed by durham and its thriving environment for african-american business. on that visit pete became acquainted with a gentleman named john stewart whom i remember so well. president of mutual savings and loan association there in durham, and he was offered a job as a teller. he was more than a teller, after 25 years he became chief executive officer in less than 25 years. that was remarkable. during his tenure at the savings and loan association, he continued to build on the groundbreaking work of other men ke john and c.c. and mr. moore, and james shepherd, and john wheeler, and w.g. pierson, and many, many others in helping to grow what was known nationally as the black wall street. pete served at the helm of mutual savings and loan during the institution's most successful years. he spearheaded the transition from a mutual savings and loan association to a mutual savings bank, and also led to the acquisitions of american federal savings and loan and greensboro national bank. mr. allison was a pillar of the durham community f
states. dina cappiello, the national environment reporter for the associated press, joins me now. 27 1/2 million dollars in finds, $200 million for the cleanup. in the range of penalty, how does this rank? >> it's the biggest ever for a company that violates its water pollution permits. other companies that paid big fines in the past in 2008, the e.p.a. said this is the biggest ever for a company that violated permits it had from states. >> ifill: describe the pollution. >> we're talking about 6,000 violations over 300 state-issued permits, hundreds of streams, tributaries and rivers, 79 active coal minus, over 20 coal processing plants where they put the coal and wash it before it's shipped, over five appalachian states, so it's a pretty massive coverage area for the settlement. >> reportersettlement. >> ifill: how did the discharges occur? >> they're actually piped into the waterways and states issue permits for the companies that give them certain limits and in this case this company repeatedly from 2006 to 2013 exceeded those limits, that they were actually authorized to discharge.
to do to try to stabilize an environment that has become dangerous in many respects. we will have a chance talk about , a country that is of critical importance, where we have the opportunity, i think i might to move beyond recent over several west years and there is a path to transition within egypt. to security asnt well as u.s. security. we will talk about iraqi and my absolutely -- my absolute to makee -- commitment sure that it ran does not have a nuclear weapon. can potentially lead to a solution that ensures that iran is not developing a nuclear weapon. we will spend time talking about the prospect of peace between israelis and palestinians. i want to commend publicly the efforts that prime minister netanyahu have made and very link the and painstaking negotiations with my secretary of state, john kerry. are tough negotiations. the issues are profound. the reason that they would have been resolved years ago but prime minister netanyahu has approached these negotiations with a level of seriousness and commitment that reflect his leadership and the desire for the israeli peop
a problem for kids living in some of the world's harsher environments. that is, until now. >> i was watching a news story, heartbreaking news story about the polite of children in war decency and refugee camps. it was explaining that the simplest and most effective therapy to bring them back to humanity was just a play, simple, unstructured play. >> that was all the inspiration tim needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to developing and third world communities, but he also knew that those soccer balls didn't last very long in the harsh playing fields often found in those communities. he imagined a solution. >> to make a ball for these children that would never go flat so they could play and get that per pi. >> he is a a a lyricist by trade. 11 months and two tries later, the one world football project created a nearly indestructible ball made from unique cross ling cell foam that doesn't need to be inflated. >> when done you had something that could work? >> the very first thing they said was a total failure. when i took it out of the box, i threw it on the ground and it b
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)